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    30Jan

    State of the World’s Forests 2018

    • 2019 | 10:25 AM

    Achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, including the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), is a commitment made by countries to tackle the complex challenges we face, from ending poverty and hunger and responding to climate change to building resilient communities, achieving inclusive growth and sustainably managing the Earth’s natural resources.[Read More]

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    19Jul

    State of the World's Forests 2016 (SOFO)

    • 2016 | 03:56 PM

    Forests and trees support sustainable agriculture. They stabilize soils and climate, regulate water flows, give shade and shelter, and provide a habitat for pollinators and the natural predators of agricultural pests. They also contribute to the food security of hundreds of millions of people, for whom they are important sources of food, energy and income. Yet, agriculture remains the major driver of deforestation globally, and agricultural, forestry and land policies are often at odds.

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    19Jul

    State of the World's Forests 2016 (SOFO)

    • 2016 | 03:47 PM

    Forests and trees support sustainable agriculture. They stabilize soils and climate, regulate water flows, give shade and shelter, and provide a habitat for pollinators and the natural predators of agricultural pests. They also contribute to the food security of hundreds of millions of people, for whom they are important sources of food, energy and income. Yet, agriculture remains the major driver of deforestation globally, and agricultural, forestry and land policies are often at odds.[Read More]

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    21May

    Public Relations for Forest Science (IUFRO)

    • 2015 | 01:27 PM

    This manual is primarily intended for use by forest scientists who want to communicate their research results to various forest stakeholder groups including the public at large. It will also serve PR officers and research managers in the field of forest science to learn from other experts and refine their own skills in communicating forest research. The manual covers the most important concepts and methods in the field of public relations and presents these in an easy to understand manner. This will allow the non-experts in the public relations field to apply these tools as an effective means of interacting with forest stakeholders and the general public, and in this way dealing with the constant changes in society. The authors are convinced that through this manual users will be motivated and inspired to involve the public for the dissemination of scientific knowledge related to forests and trees.[Read More]

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    21May

    Communicating Forest Science (IUFRO)

    • 2015 | 11:10 AM

    Communicating about science in the setting of a forest, grove of trees, or chaparral can bring people with very different experiences together in unexpected and, sometimes, highly productive ways. The language of science translated and brought to non-scientists can transform confusion into understanding. When communicated well – whether in a forest, in a meeting room, or across the miles electronically – science information helps people sort out complex situations and changing conditions related to forests.[Read More]

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    05May

    EFI News 1 - 2013

    • 2015 | 02:24 PM

    European forests have a special year. First, this year EFI is celebrating its 20th anniversary, and we believe it is not only a celebration for EFI member organisations and Member Countries, or for the Institute itself, but an opportunity for the whole European forest sector to bring the continent’s forests into discussions and to increase their visibility. The ‘EFI 20 Years Science and Policy Forum’ will celebrate two decades of European forest networking from 23–27 September in Nancy, France. We invite you all to share your views on ‘Our forests in the 21st century – ready for risks and opportunities’. The year closes with the European Forest Week from 9–13 December organised by various forest organisations in Europe. During this week, everyone is encouraged to hold activities to raise awareness and strengthen political commitment and action, in a effort to continue working towards sustainable forest management. One way of bringing European forests into discussions is through the ThinkForest forum. Just a few months ago, issues related to the sustainability criteria of forest biomass were debated at a ThinkForest event in the European Parliament. Two weeks later, the adaption of forests to climate change was in focus during a similar event. On both[Read More]

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    05May

    The EU Forest Action Plan

    • 2015 | 02:24 PM

    Forests are an important part of Europe's heritage and identity. When satellites observe Europe from the skies, they see large masses of green. Forests and other wooded areas cover over 40% of the European Union of 27 Member States. But this huge area does not always receive the public attention it deserves, though forests have been essential throughout our history – for fuel, for shelter, for the air we breathe. Forests also contribute to our quality of life and the social and cultural dimensions of forests are increasingly appreciated by our society.[Read More]

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    05May

    THE CATALLOGUE ON BEST PRACTICES

    • 2015 | 02:24 PM

    Forests are a source of renewable tangible resources and non tangible services. In Catalonia forest structure is the result of a strong anthropic influence, its abandonment and its consequent lack of management. 63% of Catalonian surface is covered by forest, from which 77% is privately owned. This means that the ultimate responsibility of forest management relies in private foresters. Nonetheless, forest management should guarantee the different environmental and social functions that forests provide. Society increasingly consumes these forest functions and simultaneously increases awareness of and demands on the wealth that forest functions generate. Specifically, the weight of non-wood forest products is very important in the Mediterranean environment. Their free harvesting is very common by a large part of society. In this context, natural resources managers may need new incentives that stimulate forest management and hence warrant mushrooms’ conservation. Economic instruments emerge as an interesting option that contributes to the diversification of the finance of such management.[Read More]

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    05May

    Good practice guidance on the sustainable mobilisation of wood in Europe

    • 2015 | 11:44 AM

    According to the study on wood availability and demand11, developed by UNECE/FAO, the University of Hamburg and partners in 2007, the increasing demands for woody biomass will intensify competition for wood supply, in view of the growing requirements from both bioenergy and the forest products industries. The study projected, based on recent rates of increase, that for the years 2010 and 2020 more wood (respectively 185 million (M) m3 and 448 M m3) would be required to meet the estimated wood demands (Table 1). A further estimation was made for 2020, based on a lower (75%) projection, allowing for more rapid interim growth of the contribution from other biomass sources, such as agricultural crops and residues, and municipal waste.[Read More]

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    05May

    A Mediterranean Forest Research Agenda (MFRA) 2010-2020

    • 2015 | 11:44 AM

    Since the beginning of the 1990s, forests and forestry have become key topics on the international political agenda as demonstrated by the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) in Rio in 1992 and the Ministerial Conferences on the Protection of Forests in Europe (MCPFE), which started in Strasbourg in 1991. Since then, international conferences and political processes have constantly emphasised the need to preserve and conserve boreal, temperate and tropical forest ecosystems. However, it has to be recognised that apart from the FAO initiative of drawing up a Mediterranean forests action programme (approved at the March 1992 session of Silva Mediterranea in Faro, Portugal), little attention has been paid to Mediterranean forests at the international level, apart from the recurrent issue of forest fires. No comprehensive, joint international research agenda has been developed to simultaneously address the economic, ecological, and social challenges of sustainable Mediterranean forest management[Read More]

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